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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the first people to greet mandela after he was released from prison. what a great day that was. we'll talk about it. and he wrote a book entitled "mandela's way." and charles ogletree who marched for mandela's freedom and subsequently met with him several times. welcome to all of you. it's a great privilege to have this conversation. i want to begin in south africa with charlene hunter-gault and have her set the scene with this national period of mourning and reflection and celebration. good morning, charlene. >> reporter: right now, david, it is pouring down rain, and in south africa rain is a sign o
that president obama met mandela. he didn't, this last time he went to south africa, because he was so ill and he wanted to respect the feengs of the family and he didn't go to see him. but clearl you c tell how could it be any other way that obama was so incredibly and heavily influenced and inspired by the struggle of nelson mandela. >> fareed, your thoughts after hearing the president of the united states. >> one of the things, wolf, that president obama reminded us was that this was one of the great moral causes and political causes of the 1980s and '90s. you remember it well and we have forgotten now, but it was one of the great rallying causes on college campuses around the western world. it was even true in asia. it was a cause that really was global in a way that very few were, because it was such a sore, a cancer, on global society, the idea that you had this white minority regime treating african blacks almost like slaves and this extraordinary system of institutionalized serfdom that was apartheid. obama reminds us that he, like many, many people, spent some time protesting against it,
of the decades of momentous change he did so much to bring about. south africa comes to terms with the death of the father of their brain that nation. the well known zone with them. us president barack obama has paid homage to one of his peers at a special address at the white house. for now. let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela left the man who took history this dance. and that the arco more universe. for justice for his journey from a prisoner. well president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better god blesses memory. and keep him in peace. he led a secretary general banking maine is also a paid his respects freedom still working. i'm falling he said them. by the passing of this in montana. this in mind that i was a triumph for justice and the tone for the human experience. daniel rode along route one which he introduced by his is set for his stubborn for human dignity keep the twenty two and freedom to touch all blacks around the well of the net with hamas in order to honor the life of nelson mandela and then he touched the w
's exactly right. i was a student at stanford when i heard the movement about divestment from south africa in 1972. in 1971, barack obama was only ten years old so he was very young and never able to appreciate that. what i want to make clear, though, we shouldn't call him militant, we shouldn't call him a terrorist, he's a patriot. he's just like the patriots fighting here many, many centuries ago for equality. and that's what he was. he was a patriot who tried to make sure that his country where he was born, where he controlled would recognize the fact that the majority of people who were african were suppressed by the minority of people who were white, and that has to be changed. he is a patriot who did a great deal in his 27 years in prison and did a great deal as president and continues to have that legacy as a patriot. i am a south african. i am an african, as he said when he got his honorary degree from harvard in 1998. that became a watershed moment of him recognizing who he was, what he was and who he's speaking for. >> but to all of you here in new york, it wasn't just that perso
of others are en route. president obama and the first lady left for south africa, board air force 1 joined by george bush and his wife. are ali velshi is leading our team in johannesburg. ali, set the scene for us literally hours before the event tomorrow in johannesburg. >> well it's gone cold, tony, it's raining tonight in johannesburg. it was a clear day. police were setting up barricades and rerouting. you could see dignitaries coming in and police convoys. as you said jimmy carter is here as well. george w. bush, bill clinton will be here, world leaders from all over the place. i had a chance to sit down with jimmy carter, who knew nelson mandela very well. he was on the same plane coming down. he said in all the times he knew nelson mandela, he never said thank you to the u.s. government to end apartheid. here's why. >> i would say i had many talks with nelson mandela. i never heard him say, that he was grateful to the united states. he was grateful to cuba, he was grateful to others that spoke up for him while he was still in prison. he was grateful to the people that condemned the
could do our part to seek the world as it should be. when president obama visited south africa this summer, mandela was so ill, the two were unable to meet. still mandela's inspiration played large during the president's trip. president obama returned to robbin island, but this time he brought his entire family. >> there was something different about bringing my children. and malia is now 15. sasha is 12, and seeing them stand within the walls that once surrounded nelson mandela, i knew this was an experience that they would never forget. i knew that they now appreciated a little bit more the sacrifices that madiba and others had made for freedom. >> reporter: soon off the leader's death was announced, obama said he could not imagine his life without mandela's example. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: president obama repeating the words there that were said of abraham lincoln after he passed away. and chris and
touch. he was only allowed two letters a year from his family. >> president obama and his family toured robben island during their first visit to south africa in june into word of any son mandela's death spread quickly around the world and the united states, of course. for many americans his death was like losing one of his own. >> president obama met the leader in 2005 and he and the first lady visited south africa in june but they were unable to meet with mandela due to his failing health. the president paid tribute to the falling icon counting himself among the millions influenced by mandela. >> the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. and like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that will nelson mandela set. >> want to bring in andrew young, civil rights leader and former ambassador to the united nations. welcome, as well as james joseph, former u.s. ambassador to south africa and duke university professor, both of who new mandela very well o
obama will travel to south africa next week, to take part in mandala's memorial services. and it's a sign of mandala's importance as a world leader that mr. obama will be joined by former presidents george w. bush and bill clinton and their wives. anthony, venita? >> bill plante at the white house this morning. >>> the world remembers nelson mandela as a fighter for justice and a great national leader. but mandala also understood the rich power of music. in tonight's 48-hour special, "nelson mandela: father of a nation" jazz legend and cbs contributor, went wibtynton marsalis shows how music became an instrument of social change in south africa. ♪ ♪ >> nelson mandela's life-long fight for freedom in south africa had a secret weapon -- music. ♪ ♪ >> one of the masters of that music, and a man who knew nelson mandela is legendary horn man, hugh masekela. we got together to remember mandala and the music that propelled a people's revolution. ♪ ♪ >> the story of nelson mandela jailed for such a long time. but what was the perception of mandala when he
determined. that is tonight on c-span and c-span3. >> president obama is on his way to south africa. he died last week at the age of 95. by formerited presidents george w. bush and former president clinton. the prime minister and other members of the house economy where there. this is one hour and a half. >> order. order. the house will wish to know how we proceed today. the questions will be carried over. office will announce consequential changes shortly. this is a special day for special tributes to a special .tatesman, nelson mandela i hope that as many members as possible will be able to contribute. contributions will continue until 10:00 p.m.. the house will also wish to know that there will be an event to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of nelson mandela taking place in westminster hall on thursday the 12th of december. >> thank you, mr. speaker. >> nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime. we are here to celebrate his character, his achievements, and his legacy. condolence books have been organized. tos evening we will fly south africa to attend the se
in south africa for the state funeral of nelson mandela. more than 90 heads of state will fly in for the event of the f and b stadium in suweto. president obama is on his way with his first lady michelle and bill clinton and george bush are on their way. mandela believed education was the foundation of a new south africa. but the legacy of apartheid is proving hard to overcome. al jazeera's feda gresse has the story. >> nelson mandela enjoying his favorite date, supporting and encouraging children in school. from the start of his career as an antiapartheid activist the statesman put education at the top of the schedule. to educate the nation's once depressed youth. in 1996, the suweto, then the language of oppression. linda molefe was one of those young students who rioted. he is now the principal of a secondary school one of suweto's most successful. he keeps eye over the classes acutely aware of the country's lessons. >> we are throwing without, knowing exactly. but later because of these little meetings or little held at night or in some corners they were trying to educate
over your latest column which focuses on the president's trip to south africa and robben island where nelson mandela was held. how much of an impact do you think nelson mandela has had on prison obama? >> well, i was standing just a few feet away from then senator obama in 2006 when he was touring robben island. i had a sense his first trip was a pilgrimage. he started his career, as everyone noted, his interest in politics being an anti-apartheid protesters. coming to robben island, getting the tour, seeing for himself, walking in the path where mandela was. you know, the picture you have on now is on his second visit. this one was last june. he did strike is some of the same pose. but you would do that. because you're looking through the -- you're in the steps of a man who lived the life who walked the walk. and i think on his first trip, seeing it for the first time, the enormity of what it was like to live under those conditions for so many years. when you see the limestone quarry that you had to stare out day after day in the blinding sun you could see there was a sense of -- i d
national anthem. the thoughts that came to glasgow from south africa this time last week were returned with generosity and good will this week. mandela was in many ways simply the best. when president obama said that we should not see his like again, i guess he was right on one level. but let us look at what mandela did and at the fact that his words and deeds moved table mountain, and let us hope that we do see his like again. let us hope that we see his like in the middle east or in the vicinity of the koreas, for example, where people are crying out for a generation of politicians of a quality that can move mountains and minds in the way that mandela did. he reminds us that our trade need not be as awful as it is often depicted. he has given us something better to work for in ourselves. >> it is a great honor to take part in this tribute to nelson mandela. as far as i am concerned, it is almost as good as the magic moment when i sat with my wife in westminster hall as he addressed both houses of our parliament as the democratically elected president of all south africans. i know tha
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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